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Randall – Conference Experiences

A gathering of Darwinians

Written by Mateen Wagiet (2nd Yr. PhD Darwin Trust Scholar)

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Figure 1: Skyline of the Great City of Edinburgh.

 

Founded in 1983 by Sir Kenneth ‘Ken’ Murray FRS FRSE FRCPAth (1930 – 2013) with the purpose of: “promoting education and research in Natural Sciences and in particular Molecular Biology”. The Darwin Trust of Edinburgh was established to support students from outside the UK who wish to study towards a PhD in the UK. Since 2015, the Randall Centre has been the home at KCL offering Darwin Trust studentships for postgraduates from Africa.

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SPECIAL BROADCAST: Single Cell Biophysics meeting in Taipei

This week, me and a couple of others blogged for the biophysical society from the Single Cell Biophysics meeting in Taipei. Here’s a run down, with links to the blogs:

The first section was about imaging techniques, including structured illumination from Suliana Manley in bacteria, and full automation of super resolution/single molecule microscopy from Masahiro Ueda. Read all about it!

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PhD life: Thoughts on a Brazilian School

The following account is written by Anna Laddach and describes her experience at the Advanced School on Biomolecular Simulation: Rosette from Fundamental Principles to Tutorials in Brasil.

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High impact research at 8000ft

On a Sunday evening in June I arrived to a purple sky over snow-capped mountains in stunning Snowmass village, Colorado, to attend the FASEB conference on ‘Cell signalling in cancer: From mechanisms to therapy’. As a 2nd year PhD student in the Randall Division at King’s College London studying the endocytosis and trafficking of EGFR directed antibody drug conjugates in lung cancer I was enthusiastic to hear the latest from the leaders in the field.

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