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KCL Science

PhD Student Blog

Forbidden Symmetry at the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition

On Sunday the 9th July X-ray crystallographers from the Asthma and Allergy group in the Randall department gathered alongside artist Dr Shelley James to present an exciting exhibition at the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition. This family-friendly event introduced children and adults alike to the fundamentals of symmetry and ‘forbidden symmetry’. Symmetry operators form the basis of crystallography and were explained using colourful tiles which members of the public arranged in patterns as seen below.

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In a pinch – cells use clathrin-coated lattice tubes to anchor themselves to the ECM during cell migration

Nadia Elkhatib and colleagues have provided evidence to explain why cells in 3D show fewer integrin rich focal adhesions compared to cells on flat surfaces.

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Top Three of the Week

The top three news stories of the week, as chosen by our resident students. This week’s top stories are coffee is good for you, a giant iceberg set adrift from Antarctica and Jupiter’s Great Red Spot.

Article written by Will Hawkes

 

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Clustermarket: the airbnb for lab equipment

How many times you went around your department looking for a specific piece of equipment to use for just that one experiment? How many times you asked around your colleagues if they knew someone that had expertise on the new experiment you were trying to set up?

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Squeezing and squashing – cells use a molecular clutch to move in 3D environments

Alexander Dunn and his colleagues look at how fibroblasts – cells that make up ‘connective tissue’ –  generate force to deform their surrounding (3D) environment.

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Top three of the week

The top three news stories of the week, as chosen by our resident students. This week’s top stories are heavy particles, hot satellites and hued coral.

Article written by Federico Donà

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Top Three of the Week

The top three news stories of the week, as chosen by our resident students. This week’s top stories are wildebeest feast, ditch the flu shot and chocolate brain boosts.

Article written by Jake Howden

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SPECIAL BROADCAST: Single Cell Biophysics meeting in Taipei

This week, me and a couple of others blogged for the biophysical society from the Single Cell Biophysics meeting in Taipei. Here’s a run down, with links to the blogs:

The first section was about imaging techniques, including structured illumination from Suliana Manley in bacteria, and full automation of super resolution/single molecule microscopy from Masahiro Ueda. Read all about it!

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Top Three of the Week

The top three news stories of the week, as chosen by our resident students. This week’s top stories are removing the sweetness of cancer, radioactive-resistant robot fish, and a new way to tan.

Article written by Willow Hight-Warburton.

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